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INDUSTRIAL COMPETITIVENESS AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Industrial Competitiveness and Energy Efficiency

Published On: March 11, 2020

Study No. 184

Energy Efficiency has played a role in business and policy options since the 1970s. Perspectives have changed over time but the underlying principles remain the same. Energy efficiency options can be cost-effective from the perspective of individuals or private businesses if the cost of the option over time is less than the amount of money they can save on their energy bill.

In this study, the focus on cost-effectiveness is further reinforced because of the consideration of energy intensive trade-exposed industries. It is in these highly competitive industries that investment is carefully weighed to ensure added expenses can improve the competitiveness of Canadian companies with their international rivals. Without that benefit, energy efficiency investments are unlikely to be supported.

Five  industries are analyzed in this study, selected based on their production energy intensity, contribution to Canada's economy, GHG emissions and trade exposure:

• Pulp and paper production

• Primary iron and steel production

• Primary aluminum production

• Chemical manufacturing (ammonia and ethylene)

• Unconventional oil production (in-situ bitumen extraction from existing fields)

Executive Summary Full Report Overview Executive Summary (French)